Original Untitled, Wyatt Rice (Advanced)

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Original Untitled, Wyatt Rice (Advanced)

This song is a deep cut. Legend says that Tony Rice introduced Wyatt and this song onstage and called the tune Original Untitled and it stuck. The track appears on the first Rice Brothers Album and would feel at home on Wyatt Rice’s album New Market Gap if that tells you anything. It is very indicative of the progressive “Rice” sound. The A part is a mixolydian vamp over two chords, similar to Tony Rice’s Port Tobacco or the vamp in the Unit Of Measure version of Manzanita. The B part is a descending G major scale over a G and C chord. However, at the end of the B part there’s a small switch to 3/4 and some mode mixture using the major Bb chord that would occur in G minor. If you like the sound of the switching between major and minor scales you might check out Crazy Creek in the intermediate section!

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Information on The Rice Brothers Album courtesy of Wikipedia.

This song is a deep cut. Legend says that Tony Rice introduced Wyatt and this song onstage and called the tune Original Untitled and it stuck. The track appears on the first Rice Brothers Album and would feel at home on Wyatt Rice’s album New Market Gap if that tells you anything. It is very indicative of the progressive “Rice” sound. The A part is a mixolydian vamp over two chords, similar to Tony Rice’s Port Tobacco or the vamp in the Unit Of Measure version of Manzanita. The B part is a descending G major scale over a G and C chord. However, at the end of the B part there’s a small switch to 3/4 and some mode mixture using the major Bb chord that would occur in G minor. If you like the sound of the switching between major and minor scales you might check out Crazy Creek in the intermediate section!

(Advanced guitar tabs generally include a very ornamented version of the melody, chord markings above (with extra extensions and variations), kick-offs, tags, and improvisation that drifts far from the melody at hand. Expect to come across hammer-ons, pull-offs, slides and more in all kinds of combinations as well as syncopation, triplets and other rhythmic challenges. These tabs are excellent if you want to get inside the head of another improviser and explore the choices that an advanced flatpicker might consider.)