Arpeggio-ageddon: 8 New Lessons! 

You may have never thought of it this way but your pentatonic scale is actually an arpeggio. If you're not familiar with your pentatonic scale yet you should check out my series on the pentatonic scale (and maybe if you have time the CAGED system too!). Here's a quick refresher, the major pentatonic scale is a five note scale that is created by removing the 4th and 7th scale degrees from the major scale. What you're left with is a new scale made of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 6th scale degrees, in the case of C major those notes would be: C, D, E, G and A. If we take those five notes and analyze their qualities to spell a chord we get: 1, 3, 5, 6, and 9 (I shifted the '2' to be part of the extended harmony as a '9'). This can now be identified as a C 6/9 chord. Continue reading...


You may have never thought of it this way but your minor pentatonic scale is actually an arpeggio too. If you're still having trouble with your pentatonic scales you should check out my series on the pentatonic scale again! Here's a quick refresher, the minor pentatonic scale is a five note scale that is created by removing the 2nd and 6th scale degrees from the major scale. What you're left with is a new scale made of the 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 7th scale degrees, in the case of C major those notes would be: C, Eb, F, G and Bb. If we take those five notes and analyze their qualities to spell a chord we get: 1, minor 3, 5, b7, and 11 (I shifted the '4' to be part of the extended harmony as an '11'). This can now be identified as a Cm11 chord. Continue reading...


Now that you can do a Cmaj7 arpeggio in five different places on the neck and a Cmin7 arpeggio in five different places on the neck, let's try using the major third from the C major arpeggio and the dominant 7 from the Cmin7 arpeggio. This will create our dominant 7 arpeggio. The dominant 7 occurs naturally to one chord in every key (the V chord). However, it can end up applied to most any major chord with the right context. So in the case of C, we have C, D, E, F, G, A, and B in our major scale. B is the 7th degree of the scale. However, that is our major 7th, to find our dominant 7th we need to flatten it by a half step.  We're going to add this new altered 7th to our existing major triad: 1, 3, 5, and the dominant 7 or C, E, G and Bb. Continue reading...

 

New Tab: The Wind That Shakes The Barley 

The Wind That Shakes The Barley (sometimes called Duncan Davidson, I Sat In The Valley Green, or The Kerry Lasses) is a reel in the key of D but little else seems to be known about it's origin. It became widespread in 1930's America as a contra-dance tune. In researching this tune I found some argument over whether it's origin is Irish or Scottish. It would seem the general consensus is Irish and certainly some of the songs more popular words were written by Irish born authors. 

In the tab here I've provided a straight version of the melody with some very brief higher position work at the end of the B section. 

New Jazz, Bluegrass, and Theory Lessons! 

We've successfully found ways to integrate all of the blue notes we set out to include. I've covered those and the techniques we used in this chart: (Click to see chart.)  

The only notes from the chromatic series that haven't been included are G# and C#. In this lesson I'll endeavor to include those notes in an effective manner so we can utilize the entire chromatic scale when soloing in any key. Continue reading...


This is another classic Tony Rice lick, you not only hear this one played by the master himself but it is constantly repeated by Tony Rice disciples. It's frequently used as a bold trail off in breaks to vocal songs. If you start the lick slightly before or even after your solo should end it extends the length of your break in a very dramatic fashion. 

Notice the lick is at it's core, an arpeggio of a G chord. It ends with some quick blue notes and then closes with the escape route technique covered in my Descending The Neck video. Continue reading...


So in the first lesson of this series we answered the question "What are modes?" and we found shapes for all seven of them. Let's talk about some of the modes in particular now. Which modes do you know? You likely already know two modes: major and minor (or Ionian and Aeloian). For instance, the G major scale and its relative minor, the E minor scale, share the same scale tones but resolve at different points. Easy. The other 5 scale tones in G major are 5 different possible modes to make from the G major scale. Let's look at all of them here. Continue reading...

 




Dec7

Broken Bow Stringband, Kulshan

Kulshan Brewery, James Street, Bellingham

Kulshan's favorite bluegrass band performs the first Wednesday of every month. Through the sounds of the banjo, mandolin, fiddle, bass and guitar they transport you back to a simpler time.

Dec9

Marcel and Nakos, Edison Inn

The Old Edison, 5829 Cains Ct, Bow, WA 98232

Marcel and Nakos are a duo from Bellingham, WA. Comprised of a guitar and a dobro, the two reminisce and draw inspiration from early American music. They play quick, crisp bluegrass and swing and croon a worrisome, honest blues and country.

Dec10

Marcel and Nakos, Bellingham Folk Festival

Dec11

Marcel's Bluegrass Jam, Bellingham Folk Festival

© Lessons With Marcel 2016